Depression Blog
ADHD and Depression — More Common Than Thought

By Douglas Cowan, Psy.D.

"Thanks for Noticin’ Me" says Eeyore. He walks slowly. He looks sad. He doesn’t accomplish much. He’s just glad to be noticed. This is Eeyore, the stuffed donkey who is so often in need of his tail being pinned back on.

Eeyore is a good picture of life is like for those who are impacted by the type of ADHD that includes sadness, or depression. It is estimated that as many as 25% of all those with ADHD have to battle depression as well. This type of ADHD is called “Limbic System ADHD” by Daniel Amen, and for good reason. SPECT scans show that when the brain is at rest, there is increased activity deep in the limbic system, in parts of the brain called the thalamus and hypothalamus. There is also a decreased level of activity in the underside of the pre-frontal cortex.

When the brain is placed under a work load, as during a homework assignment, we would expect the under-active pre-frontal cortex to increase activity and get to work. But instead, nothing changes. The over-active limbic system remains over-active, and the under-active pre-frontal cortex remains under-active.

Those with this type, or style of ADHD are often very inattentive to details, and are easily distracted by unimportant things. They have a chronic sadness or low-grade depression to deal with every day. They seem to be negative, or apathetic, and have low energy levels. They just do not seem to care. They often feel worthless, or helpless, or hopeless. As you can see this type of ADHD looks very much like a combination of ADHD and Depression.

Our specific treatment strategy for Limbic System, or Eeyore style ADHD, begins with our recommended Eating Program. In addition, experts recommend DL-Phenylalyne (up to 600 mg per day for adults), 5-HTP, and B Vitamins and St. John’s Wort (up to 600 mg per day for adults).

We think that best way to approach this problem is by using the nutraceutical medicines Attend, Extress, and Deprex, which are available over the counter. The Attend contains over 70 ingredients, including GABA, DL-Phenylalyne, Ginko, Pycnogenol and Grape Seed Extracts, 5-HTP, pregnenolone, DMAE, and more. The Extress contains GABA, DL-PA, 5-HTP, and St. John’s Wort. Deprex contains more GABA, and just 2 capsules of DEPREX contain 320 mg of St. John’s Wort and 420 mg of DL-Phenylalyne. When combined in a targeted treatment strategy like this, the individual with limbic ADHD can expect to see improved and stabilized moods, improved concentration, and improved memory.

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome And Depression Are Not The Same Thing!


By Claire Williams

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome is a very misunderstood illness and this is perhaps why there are so many myths about it. Perhaps the most common myth about Chronic Fatigue Syndrome is that it is effectively a mental condition, and another name for depression.

But these two conditions are very different!

And when you label a condition incorrectly it can cause no end of problems when trying to diagnose and treat it. So it’s extremely important to make the distinction between Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and depression - because they are completely different illnesses.

For one, depression can be a symptom of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, but there are many Chronic Fatigue Syndrome sufferers out there who do not suffer from depression at all.

Second, research has shown that Chronic Fatigue Syndrome sufferers have an abnormality in their ‘deep sleep’ brainwave patterns. In contrast, depression sufferers do not have this abnormality.

In addition, depression sufferers tend to feel tired all the time, whereas Chronic Fatigue Syndrome sufferers’ exhaustion increases notably after mental or physical exertion.

There are also symptoms of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome that are not shared by depression sufferers. Nasty flu-like symptoms, headaches, reversal of sleeping patterns, painful muscles and joints, Restless Legs Syndrome, and an increase in colds and viruses all are just a few symptoms that can play a part in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.

These are just a few of the differences between Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and depression!

Another myth about Chronic Fatigue Syndrome is that all Chronic Fatigue Syndrome sufferers need to do is to ‘pull themselves together’ - and they’d be cured…

… if only it were that simple!

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome is actually a bio-physical condition and was (finally) accepted as such by the UK government in 2001. But no cure has yet been found.

Unfortunately there are still many people out there (including some medical professionals) who still think that the condition is ‘all in the sufferer’s head’.

It is because of this misunderstanding that the Chronic Fatigue Syndrome community has fought so hard against Chronic Fatigue Syndrome being wrongly labelled as a mental illness. And it is perhaps because of this battle that depression amongst Chronic Fatigue Syndrome sufferers has often sadly been overlooked…

Yet for many, depression can be a very real symptom of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. If you suffer from depression as a Chronic Fatigue Syndrome sufferer, then it’s vital that you take it very seriously and that you try to address it as soon as possible.